Posts Tagged Kebari

October Orange

October Orange . . .

October Icons: Caddis and Columbus
(NYC 10 2019)

The sugar maples turn orange and blend with oak red and locust gold. The October Caddis, primarily orange, well imitated by means of orange floss.

Orange on the water in New York City is the space occupied by the pumpkinseed sunfish. Small, yet spirited, and still at times encountered in October when the trees hold onto their color just before the leaf hatch.

Pumpkinseed Sunfish (Lepomis Gibbosus)

Oranage everywhere. “Boo!” without the hoo.

Happy Halloween.

Portrait Of My Halloween Costume
(10 31 2019)

– rPs 10 31 2019

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End of July Fluke

End of July Fluke . . .

 

Proper Beach Fluke Release
(07 2019)

The find for a good start: an empty stretch of beach, early, sun behind, near a narrow point connecting back bay with channel, sand underfoot. It’s summer.

The small tungsten bucktail kebari with perhaps an especially long saddle feather may be swung off a line of fifteen to twenty feet in combined length. The tide incoming or outgoing swings the pattern on a current like a trout stream seam within the greater bay. Sometimes a striper, also short,  intercedes, but this season is ruled by the summer flounder.

Fluke Kandy
(NYC 07n2019)

Another summer morning, another sudden solid connection with a fluke on the swing.

A Beauty By the Jetty
(07 2019)

The left-eyed flatfish, the summer flounder, fluke, is game for fly patterns. The black crappie of the sea, perhaps, to my personal perception of parallel connection. The southpaw fluke stands as a visual stealth and surge predator that seeks smaller fish.

Width adds weight to the battle after the connection is made and a demonstrative tenkara rod hookset sets with success. Nothing else quite feels like a flounder on the end of a line: the uppercut take, the fluttering stand-off, the evasions the fish’s nearly two-dimensional form can achieve.

Shorts are the rule. True. Catch and release is not only fun saltwater panfishing; it’s the law. So many fluke caught are just below the legal length that one must assume keepers are in fact almost always kept.

I release all, with the option open to keep.

Path to Fluke Point
(07 2019l)

 

— rPs 07 31 2019

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See Bass?

See Bass? . . .

 

Line on the Water
(NJ 04 2019)

Tenkara rod yamame tethered to a small sparkled shrimp kebari found no willing herring or striper schoolie to tempt. The floating 8-weight line on a reel reached farther into the solunar peak and still found no takers, no curious passes from bass in the deeper water where the current’s piled sand  flat dropped off into dark gray.

Water calm, a pass of squall coal gray cloud and on wind holding a spatter of rain. Calm times felt in a zone, fishy, and at that when came the yank, a strong physical stop below the surface. Hot Tail Half and Half, my own fly from a box full of talented friend’s, fooled a fish, too.

One hand managed one shot on the phone fly from the battle middle when eyes saw a dark form sprinting from a puff of sand in two feet of estuary water. See bass, see not a bass, but an early fluke, a fine one flipped off with a smile as flatfish fled.

Sand Trail of a Fluke in Flight
(NJ 04 2019)

 

Water too cold at 47 degrees Fahrenheit ( 8 Celcius) for the striped bass where I have been to fish The search continues. The season is early.

Fishing is not catching, yet, in or out of net, there is always a view.
(NJ 04 2019)

 

The saltwater season of 2019 has begun.

— rPs 04 17 2019

 

 

 

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Happy (7th) Anniversary

Happy (7th) Anniversary . . .

 

Ebisu tenkara rod tipped by an Olive Woolly Bugger tied by Urban Angler’s Dennis Feliciano.
(NYC 04 2019)

The best way to celebrate seven (7!) continuous years of tenkara in Manhattan was to fish, photograph, and write all about it.

April, still mostly cold and gray, offers the local season’s most consistent angling for black crappie and the golden shiner, Notemigonus crysoleucas, a hard hitting, fast sprinting fish that in almost every way resembles its European cousin, the Rudd.

My first, and favorite, TUSA Ebisu rod retains it’s fine 5/5 action and good luck. A few overcast afternoon hours spent along the banks of Central Park’s ponds produced the two key species of the season:

Black Crappie

Black Crappie
(NYC 04 2019)

 

Golden Shiner

Golden Shiner
(NYC 04 2019)

 

Tenkara continues to take Manhattan seven years on, and counting.

Happy Anniversary, TTM . . .

— rPs 04 09 2019

 

Postscript: Revisit the first post of TTM by following this link:  https://tenkaratakesmanhattan.com/2012/04/09/hello-world/

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Tie Up Loose Ends

Tie Up Loose Ends . . .

Partridge & Orange, Deer & Orange
(NYC 03 2019)

Trout season in New York state opens April 1st. Time to tie up loose ends and whip finish those kebari fly patterns . . .

 

By Ebisu

Patterns go
In a stream’s flow.

Fishers,
Men and women,

Tie together
As feathers and fur do

When wrapped
By thread and floss;

Their names, embossed,
Become floating sculptures.

 

Optional Author’s Note: Ebisu is the Japanese god of fisherman, good luck, and workingmen, as well as the guardian of small children’s health. He is one of the Seven Gods of Fortune, and the only one of the seven to originate in Japan. This poem, about the legacy of fly tiers and their namesake creations, was composed while sitting by an image of Ebisu, thus the title.

 

— rPs 03 26 2019

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The Winter Vice

The Winter Vice . . .

A Fly Tying Vise In Winter
(NYC 01 2019)

To tie the artificial fly is a proper way to spend fishing time when winter water runs under ice. Still water, too, so still as to be stiff, under ice. Time to read and write and tie the fly.

Why yes.

When winter warms, by whatever reason, the result is a new, almost opposite, reality: time when fly tying can be viewed as a vice, a vice practiced at the vise when you could instead get up and out and fish a rare treat — open water in winter.

Open Water In Winter
(NYC)

 

EARLY Season Largemouth Bass
(NYC,)

Winter water with active fish = tenkara happiness

— rPs 01 29 2019

 

 

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The Brown Belt

The Brown Belt

 

November: Stream Banks Bare But For Nuts

The brown belt of tenkara fly fishing seen in the riparian gone to seed, felt in the waders in the cold, in the damp, in the brief days of November. To earn it is to do it. The reward, layered as most good things are, is that the fish, though scattered, sporadic, remain strong, with a few willing to strike a kebari worked perhaps at a slower pace than in spring or summer.

 

November Fallfish

The sound of the moving water holds tight to a higher presence on a stream lined by trees bare but for nuts and a few aged leaves faded like worn pennants.

 

Swans, Lake
(NYC 11 2018)

The pond as well has weathered the autumnal transition, and with the leaf hatch over, the fallen herded into a few corner spots, open waters rippled by wind look dark chocolate. Tannin depth nurtured by the afternoon switch from light to night, brief, almost beyond belief.

 

Largemouth Bass
(NYC 11 2018)

The reward, to repeat, the reward is that the fish, though scattered, sporadic, remain strong, with a few willing to strike a kebari worked perhaps at a slower pace than in spring or summer.

— rPs 11 30 2018

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