Trout 3, Ebisu 1

Trout 3, Ebisu 1 . . .

 

Eastern PA Trout Stream (05 2015)

Eastern PA Trout Stream
(05 2015)

 

Streams that for whatever reason hold a sparse number of trout, perhaps two or three per mile, can make even a stocked trout fishery a challenge tenkara can handle.

Handle of pine: the Ebisu this time out. The 12-foot rod’s more limber 5/5 flex allowed tighter casts within side channels the width of city sidewalks. Runs walled by spring green, everything from tenacious native saplings to the shallow-rooted immigrant Japanese Knotweed.

 

Side Channel Drift (05 2015)

Side Channel Drift
(05 2015)

 

The traditional tapered line with six feet of 6X tippet landed soft hackles and nymphs with stealth along promising seams. The pine handle gives the Ebisu the feel of a baseball bat tapering to a 1-weight graphite tipped with a matching fly line.

 

Pointing In The Trout's Direction: Ebisu, Line Holder, Traditional Tapered Line (05 2015)

Pointing In The Trout’s Direction:
Ebisu, Line Holder, Traditional Tapered Line
(05 2015)

 

The Philadelphia Phillies, hosting the New York Mets and Pittsburgh Pirates, in that order, brought me to Philadelphia for a few days. Valley Creek, French Creek, and Pickering Creek were nearby. The Wissahickon, The Schuylkill, and The Pennypack were within range. Waters borne on the pages of Philadelphia on the Fly and Small Fry: The Lure of the Little.

What mattered more than destination this time was the full fishing experience with all of its supporting details. Spring fishing offers riparian zones flush with wildflowers and songbirds and streams, some marginal at other times of the year, now with trout, holdovers, survivors from the weeks following the opener.

Reports of “little black stoneflies” were replaced by the actual witness to a few scattered rising Hendricksons approximated by a size 14. Forage of the moment took many, more meaty, forms: tiny black tadpoles, parent frogs, crayfish, and earthworms all were sighted in and along several streams. The flows were solid, clear, and warmer than expected given the long winter that had encased the Northeast in snow for three months.

My India Hen and Herl and Silver Ribbed Deer Hair and Black soft hackles in size 12 fit just as well a hatchling tadpole. They were that small; the squiggling creature’s head and tail resembled a comma.

 

The Ronnie Cash: Soft Hackles Dressed In Black (05 2015)

The Ronnie Cash:
Soft Hackles Dressed In Black
(05 2015)

 

Both patterns worked.

Trout, the simple fins to face direct encounter, were few. Again, these were scattered survivors of the opener. Natural forage was on their menu. Artificial colors and sweeteners had been by now learned to be avoided. Imitation, a general for the surveyed stream forage, called for some personal combination of thread, feather, perhaps fur and various glitter of some material, the blacker, the better.

Tussles on the Ebisu were strong, yet static, a kind of slow motion take that saw trout drop the fly three out of four times along two wades of a mile and back.

One rainbow in the net serves posterity enough. One rainbow a caudal fin short of a foot. The fish landed, and all the fish lost, were appreciated in light of the effort involved to lure their strikes.

 

Rainbow Trout (05 2015)

Rainbow Trout
(05 2015)

 

Insights on fly pattern awareness, as well as sightings of Baltimore orioles in full song and flight, wildflowers like the Mayapple, wild Mustards in abundance, plus a single Jack-in the-Pulpit, made a satisfying spring weekend of baseball and fly fishing that ended: Trout 3, Ebisu 1.

– rPs 05 13-14 2015

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Tenkara & Sabiki

Tenkara & Sabiki . . .

Sabiki: pencils on paper (04 2015)

Sabiki: pencils on paper
(04 2015)

Sabiki rigs employ another Japanese method of catching fish. Perhaps some variation might be employed using a tenkara rod? Last year’s toe dip into the world of saltwater panfishing proved tenkara equipment was up to the challenge.

A Typical Sabiki Rig

A Typical Sabiki Rig

Stay tuned for more reportage from the salt. Meanwhile, traditional tenkara kebari remain a model for some of my sketches-in-progress.

Kebari Model and Sketch (04 2015)

Kebari Model and Sketch
(04 2015)

— rPs 04 30 2015

Postscript: Here is a link to last year’s initial foray into saltwater tenkara: http://tenkaratakesmanhattan.com/2014/07/25/the-salt-on-the-level/

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Swegman’s Sunfish Catches A Fish

Swegman’s Sunfish Catches A Fish . . .

Swegman's Sunfish

Swegman’s Sunfish

Swegman’s Sunfish lured Lepomis with orange breasts to match the twitch, hooked, and tethered to a hook holding hair rather than feather.

Swegman's Sunfish Angle

Swegman’s Sunfish Angle

Will mention also another mention of the Green Guarantee:

Green Guarantee Incite Bluegill

Green Guarantee Incite Bluegill

As well as the smaller Deer and Green soft hackle:

Deer and Green Incite Bluegill

Deer and Green Incite Bluegill

Green guaranteed even as the NYC region remains brown.

– rPs 04 13 2015

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April Gray

April Gray . . .

Gray Ghost

Gray Ghost

The image at the head is a photo in situ of Gray Ghost, an original work reproduced in color on the pages of Philadelphia on the Fly.

Check “A Very Scary Fish Story” next time you crack open the first edition.

A Very Scary Fish Story

A Very Scary Fish Story

— rPs 04 07 2015

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Tenkara Art: Primary Kebari 2

Tenkara Art: Primary Kebari 2 . . .

Primary Kebari 2: a partridge and white warm season soft hackle. (image copyright 2015 by ron P. swegman. All rights reserved.)

Primary Kebari 2: a partridge and white warm season soft hackle.
(image copyright 2015 by ron P. swegman. All rights reserved.)

Partridge and White

The Partridge and White Rabbit kebari is another pale pattern for warm day hatch matches of light mayfly and caddisfly species in sizes 12 to 18. Note the traditional tenkara orientation of the feather hackle. Ribbed or not, the texture of angora rabbit adds extra body. Drift from upstream with the intent on guiding the float back to the angler’s waist or free hand unless the lure of the little trout or panfish intercedes first.

The illustration uses primary colors rendered in an abstract expressionist manner to contrast with the subaqueous white.

— rPs 03 30 2015

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Tenkara Art: Deer and Green

Tenkara Art: Deer and Green . . .

Deer and Green: an American kebari (image copyright 2015 by ron P. swegman. All rights reserved.)

Deer and Green: an American kebari
(image copyright 2015 by ron P. swegman. All rights reserved.)

The Deer Hair and Green is a soft hackle kebari tied with an American or Western oriented hackle. The recipe includes four-strand floss, French tinsel, and deer hair. Eastern brook trout are attracted to this pattern in size 14 through 18.

A large portrait of a small kebari lends an illustrative slant with a faded, marbled, impressionistic effect, the way the eyes perceive the soft blur of a pattern set in clear stream water. Colored and other pencils on acid-free paper in natural light remain my medium and process.

— rPs 03 23 2015

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On Parade

On Parade . . .

Green Guarantees (c. 2015)

Green Guarantees
(c. 2015)

Green Guarantee

Color conveys the general feel of this fly pattern. Warm in a rustic and pastoral way. Of course, fishes. The small shiner or chub minnow here meets adequate imitation. Unweighted, this one serves well under the controlled twitch of a tenkara rod along seams of current following fast water. Weighted, this pattern oriented forward can dart along submerged walls of stone or weed. Most of the freshwater fishes find such presentations interesting.

— rPs 03 17 2015

Postscript: You can read more about the Green Guarantee in my second book, Small Fry: The Lure of the Little. Links to online purchasing options are available on the tool bar to the right of the screen. Or visit the website of The Whitefish Press: http://www.whitefishpress.com/bookdetail.asp?book=87

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